The treatment at a urethral stricture

Since the causes of urethral stricture are individually, there can also be no general treatment plan. Instead, an individually tailored treatment plan needs to be created in any case according to precise investigations. In its planning, the following factors play a crucial role: the length and position of striction, amount of moderate urine, existing urinary tract infections (UTIs) and the involvement of the kidneys. In most cases, therapeutic measures include an invasive and not very easy operation in case of a urethral stricture. These are carried out as a rule in specialized clinics, in order to avoid complications. Depending on the shape of the urethral narrowing a matching surgical technique…

What happens during a urethral stricture?

The first sign for a urethral stricture is a clearly diminished stream of urine. This change in the urine stream is also the clearest sign for this disease. The stream doesn’t just have to be weaker, but it can also appear different in form and / or direction. A different form means that the urine does not necessarily flow in one stream, but rather widespread. Sometimes, the affected person has to press for urine to flow. It can also be the case that the urine stream is delayed since the urine first needs to pass the stricture of the urethra. Another complication of urethral strictures is residual urine in the…

Scar formations as a consecutive complication

Another unpleasant complication of urethral strictures is the formation of scars on parts of the cavernous body of the penis, the so called corpus spongiosum. If this remains untreated for a longer period, it can lead to complete scarring of the cavernous body which is called spongiofibrosis and entails erectile dysfunction of the penis. This implies that quick action is required and it is important not to wait too long until seeking medical attention. The doctor can minimize the risk of complications for the patient with the appropriate treatment.

Medical examinations and diagnosis of urethral strictures

The urologist is the medical specialist for all diseases of the urinary tract. The urologist should be consulted as soon as any changes become noticeable. When patients report changes in the flow of urine or frequent infections of the urinary tract, the urologist will investigate the presence of a urethral stricture. In many cases however, urethral strictures remain inconspicuous until the onset of acute urinary retention. Until the underlying causes become more specific, the urologist will focus on creating an anamnesis. This involves documenting the patient’s entire medical history and recording detailed descriptions of the physical complaints. Typical questions asked for the anamnesis include the following:   Have diseases of…

Congenital malformation as a cause of urethral strictures

In five to ten percent of cases, congenital malformations of the urethra constitute the underlying cause of urethral strictures. Physicians distinguish between different types of malformation and the specific procedures involved in removing the urethral stricture. Urethral valves are sail-like membranes that are located within the urethra and cause it to constrict. Meatal stenosis is the medical term applied to a narrowing of the opening of the urethra. Another of these congenital abnormalities is the aforementioned hypospadias, in which the patient is born with an unusually short urethra. An additional five percent of strictures are caused by a condition known as lichen sclerosus. This inflammatory skin condition involves hardening and…